Louis Vuitton – A Legendary History

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Louis Vuitton

Louis Vuitton – When he was only sixteen years old, Louis Vuitton made a decision that would not only change his own life but the lives of his sons and future generations, he would become a trunk maker.

Louis Vuitton was a French box-maker and packer who founded the luxury brand of the same name over 150 years ago. From humble beginnings in the French countryside, Vuitton’s skill, innovation and determination quickly saw his signature trunks coveted by the world’s elite. Now, with Marc Jacobs at the helm as creative director since 1997, the house has expanded its offering to include bags, clothing, shoes, accessories and jewellery, making it one of the most valuable luxury brands in the world.

  • Vuitton was born on August 4, 1821 in Anchay, a small working-class settlement in the east of France. His father, Xavier Vuitton, was a farmer and his mother, Coronne Gaillard – who died when he was 10 – a miller.
  • At the age of 13, tired of provincial life and of his strict stepmother, Vuitton left home for Paris. The 292 mile journey took him two years on foot with stops to carry out odd jobs to support himself along the way.
  • Upon arrival in Paris in 1837, Vuitton became an apprentice at a successful box-making and packing workshop – a craft that was highly respected at the time. Within a few years he had gained a reputation as one of the best in his field in the city.
  • Vuitton’s fortunes rose again in 1853 when he was appointed the personal box-maker and packer of the Empress of France, Eugenie de Montijo – the wife of Napoleon Bonaparte. The Empress charged Vuitton with beautifully packaging her clothes for transportation between the Tuileres Palace, the Château de Saint-Cloud and various seaside resorts. The position opened the doors to a new class of elite and royal clientele.
  • In 1854 Vuitton married 17-year-old Clemence-Emilie Parriaux. Shortly afterwards he left the shop he had apprenticed for and opened his own box-making and packing workshop in Paris. The sign outside read: “Securely packs the most fragile objects. Specialising in packing fashions”. He also began creating his trunks in canvas instead of leather, which gave them the advantage of being hard-wearing and waterproof.
  • Four years later, Vuitton introduced stackable rectangular shaped trunks to a market in which they had previously been rounded. Demand for the innovative and convenient trunk, which addressed the requirements of increasingly popular travel by train, was such that he had to expand into a larger workshop outside of Paris.
  • In 1867 Vuitton was awarded a bronze medal at the Exposition Universelle, an international exposition organised by Napoleon and held in Paris, which further increased the popularity of his work.
  • During the Franco-Prussian War, from 1870-71, Vuitton’s workshop was looted and destroyed. Once the war ended he set up a new workshop in an aristocratic area of central Paris.
  • Vuitton introduced a trunk in a beige and red striped canvas in 1872. The design appealed to the new Parisian elite and helped secure the brand’s position as a luxury offering.
  • In 1889 Vuitton won a gold medal and the grand prize at the Exposition Universelle, which once again helped to bolster the popularity of his work.
  • Vuitton continued to work until his death at the age of 72 on February 27, 1892. He left control of the company to his son, Georges Vuitton.
  • In 1896, in response to widespread copying of the brand’s patterns (a problem that continues to plague the house today), Georges created the famous LV monogram canvas – featuring diamonds, circles and flowers – to distinguish the brand’s products.
  • The Louis Vuitton building, the largest travel-goods store in world, was opened on the Champs-Élysées in 1914 and counted Coco Chanel as a patron.
  • Bag shapes that remain popular fashion staples today were introduced throughout the 1900s. The Steamer bag, a smaller piece designed to be kept inside the luggage trunks, was introduced in 1901. The Keepall bag was debuted in 1930 followed by the Noé bag, which was originally designed to carry Champagne, in 1932, and, in 1966, the cylindrical Pappillon bag.
  • Thanks to advances in technology and a new coating process, a supple version of the monogram canvas was created in 1959. This allowed it to be used for purses, bags and wallets.
  • In 1997 Marc Jacobs was appointed the house’s first creative director and was charged with introducing men’s and women’s ready-to-wear collections. At the time, Jacobs told US Vogue: “What I have in mind are things that are deluxe but that you can also throw into a bag and escape town with, because Louis Vuitton has a heritage in travel.”
  • Jacobs collaborated with designer Stephen Sprouse in 2001 to create a limited-edition line of bags featuring “Louis Vuitton” written in graffiti over the monogram pattern.
  • The house has cultivated a strong celebrity following under Jacobs’ direction and many models, actors and musicians have been the face of the brand. For the Core Values campaign, introduced in 2007 and aimed at showcasing the brand’s travel roots, celebrities such as Angelina Jolie, Bono, Sean Connery, Keith Richards and Catherine Deneuve have appeared. Other campaigns have included Natalia Vodianova, Christy Turlington and Kate Elson for autumn/winter 2010-11; Madonna for spring/summer 2009; Diane Kruger, Chloe Sevigny, Christina Ricci and Scarlett Johanssen for spring/summer 2007; Scarlett Johanssen for autumn/winter 2004-05; and Jennifer Lopez for autumn/winter 2003-04.
  • In 2012 the house won a landmark ruling in the US protecting it from large-scale international counterfeiting. The ruling helps stop the import of goods into the US that illegally bear the brand’s trademarks, and penalises companies that facilitate the trade of those goods.
  • In the same year Louis Vuitton was named the world’s most valuable luxury brand for the seventh year in a row in a study conducted by Millward Brown Optimor. Valued at $25.9 billion (£16.5 billion) it beat Hermes, valued at $19.1 billion (£12.1 billion) in second place and Rolex, at $7.17 billion (£4.57 billion) in third place.

Louis Vuitton Malletier, commonly referred to as Louis Vuitton or shortened to LV, is a French fashion house founded in 1854 by Louis Vuitton. The label’s LV monogram appears on most of its products, ranging from luxury trunks and leather goods to ready-to-wear, shoes, watches, jewelry, accessories, sunglasses and books. Louis Vuitton is one of the world’s leading international fashion houses; it sells its products through standalone boutiques, lease departments in high-end department stores, and through the e-commerce section of its website. For six consecutive years (2006–2012), Louis Vuitton was named the world’s most valuable luxury brand. Its 2012 valuation was US$25.9 billion.The 2013 valuation of the brand was US$28.4 billion with revenue of US$9.4 billion. The company operates in 50 countries with more than 460 stores worldwide.

The Louis Vuitton label was founded by Vuitton in 1854 on Rue Neuve des Capucines in Paris, France. Louis Vuitton had observed that the HJ Cave Osilite[9] trunk could be easily stacked and in 1858, Vuitton introduced his flat-bottom trunks with trianon canvas, making them lightweight and airtight. Before the introduction of Vuitton’s trunks, rounded-top trunks were used, generally to promote water run off, and thus could not be stacked. It was Vuitton’s gray Trianon canvas flat trunk that allowed the ability to stack with ease for voyages. Many other luggagemakers imitated LV’s style and design.

The company participated in the 1867 Universal Exhibition in Paris. To protect against the duplication of his look, Vuitton changed the Trianon design to a beige and brown stripes design in 1876. By 1885, the company opened its first store in London on Oxford Street. Soon thereafter, due to the continuing imitation of his look, in 1888, Vuitton created the Damier Canvas pattern, which bore a logo that reads “marque L. Vuitton déposée”, which translates into “L. Vuitton registered trademark”. In 1892, Louis Vuitton died, and the company’s management passed to his son.
Advert for Louis Vuitton luggage, 1898.
After the death of his father, Georges Vuitton began a campaign to build the company into a worldwide corporation, exhibiting the company’s products at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. In 1896, the company launched the signature Monogram Canvas and made the worldwide patents on it. Its graphic symbols, including quatrefoils and flowers (as well as the LV monogram), were based on the trend of using Japanese and Oriental designs in the late Victorian era. The patents later proved to be successful in stopping counterfeiting. In this same year, Georges traveled to the United States, where he toured cities such as New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago, selling Vuitton products. In 1901, the Louis Vuitton Company introduced the Steamer Bag, a smaller piece of luggage designed to be kept inside Vuitton luggage trunks.

By 1913, the Louis Vuitton Building opened on the Champs-Elysees. It was the largest travel-goods store in the world at the time. Stores also opened in New York, Bombay, Washington, London, Alexandria, and Buenos Aires as World War I began. Afterwards, in 1930, the Keepall bag was introduced. During 1932, LV introduced the Noé bag. This bag was originally made for champagne vintners to transport bottles. Soon thereafter, the Louis Vuitton Speedy bag was introduced (both are still manufactured today).[8] In 1936 Georges Vuitton died, and his son, Gaston-Louis Vuitton, assumed control of the company.

In 1938 the writer Eric Newby bought a Louis Vuitton trunk from a railway lost property shop in London’s East India Dock Road, to take with him on board when he shipped as an apprentice on the four-masted square-rigged sailing ship Moshulu, on what turned out to be the last Grain Race between Australia and Europe. He went out in 1938 and sailed back in 1939. He tells of his adventures in his autobiographical book The Last Grain Race.

Collaboration
During World War II, Louis Vuitton collaborated with the Nazis during the German occupation of France. The French book Louis Vuitton, A French Saga, authored by French journalist Stephanie Bonvicini and published by Paris-based Editions Fayard[10] tells how members of the Vuitton family actively aided the puppet government led by Marshal Philippe Pétain and increased their wealth from their business affairs with the Germans. The family set up a factory dedicated to producing artifacts glorifying Pétain, including more than 2,500 busts.

Caroline Babulle, a spokeswoman for the publisher, Fayard, said: “They have not contested anything in the book, but they are trying to bury it by pretending it doesn’t exist.”[11] Responding to the book’s release in 2004, a spokesman for LVMH said: “This is ancient history. The book covers a period when it was family-run and long before it became part of LVMH. We are diverse, tolerant and all the things a modern company should be.”An LVMH spokesman told the satirical magazine Le Canard Enchainé: “We don’t deny the facts, but regrettably the author has exaggerated the Vichy episode. We haven’t put any pressure on anyone. If the journalists want to censor themselves, then that suits us fine.” That publication was the only French periodical to mention the book, LVMH is the country’s biggest advertiser in the press.

1945 through 2000
See also: Louis Vuitton Cup, America’s Cup, and LVMH

Louis Vuitton store in Nicosia, Cyprus

Louis Vuitton store in Lugano, Switzerland.

Louis Vuitton store in Ontario
During this period, Louis Vuitton began to incorporate leather into most of its products, which ranged from small purses and wallets to larger pieces of luggage. In order to broaden its line, the company revamped its signature Monogram Canvas in 1959 to make it more supple, allowing it to be used for purses, bags, and wallets. It is believed that in the 1920s, counterfeiting returned as a greater issue to continue on into the 21st century. In 1966, the Papillon was launched (a cylindrical bag that is still popular today). By 1977 with annual revenue up to 70 million Francs ($14.27 million US$). A year later, the label opened its first stores in Japan: in Tokyo and Osaka. In 1983, the company joined with America’s Cup to form the Louis Vuitton Cup, a preliminary competition (known as an eliminatory regatta) for the yacht race. Louis Vuitton later expanded its presence in Asia with the opening of a store in Taipei, Taiwan in 1983 and Seoul, South Korea in 1984. In the following year, 1985, the Epi leather line was introduced.

1987 saw the creation of LVMH. Moët et Chandon and Hennessy, leading manufacturers of champagne and cognac, merged respectively with Louis Vuitton to form the luxury goods conglomerate. Profits for 1988 were reported to have been up by 49% more than in 1987. By 1989, Louis Vuitton came to operate 130 stores worldwide. Entering the 1990s, Yves Carcelle was named president of LV, and in 1992, his brand opened its first Chinese location at the Palace Hotel in Beijing. Further products became introduced such as the Taiga leather line in 1993, and the literature collection of Voyager Avec… in 1994. In 1996, the celebration of the Centennial of the Monogram Canvas was held in seven cities worldwide.

In 1997, Louis Vuitton made Marc Jacobs its Artistic Director. In March of the following year, he designed and introduced the company’s first “prêt-à-porter” line of clothing for men and women. Also in this year products introduced included the Monogram Vernis line, the LV scrapbooks, and the Louis Vuitton City Guide.

The last events in the 20th century were the release of the mini monogram line in 1999, the opening of the first store in Africa in Marrakech, Morocco in 2000, and finally the auction at the International Film Festival in Venice, Italy, where the vanity case “amfAR” designed by Sharon Stone was sold with the proceeds going to The Foundation for AIDS Research (also in 2000).

2001 to 2011

The store on Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue.

A Louis Vuitton boutique in the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, in Milan, Italy.

5th Avenue, NYC, 2013

A Louis Vuitton store in Central, Hong Kong.

Louis Vuitton VIP room in Vienna for ordering custom designed goods.
By 2001, Stephen Sprouse, in collaboration with Marc Jacobs, designed a limited-edition line of Vuitton bags that featured graffiti written over the monogram pattern. The graffiti read Louis Vuitton and, on certain bags, the name of the bag (such as Keepall and Speedy). Certain pieces, which featured the graffiti without the Monogram Canvas background, were only available on Louis Vuitton’s V.I.P. customer list. Jacobs also created the charm bracelet, the first ever piece of jewelry from LV, within the same year.

In 2002, the Tambour watch collection was introduced. During this year, the LV building in Tokyo’s Ginza district was opened, and the brand collaborated with Bob Wilson for its Christmas windows sceneography. In 2003, Takashi Murakami, in collaboration with Marc Jacobs, masterminded the new Monogram Multicolore canvas range of handbags and accessories. This range included the monograms of the standard Monogram Canvas, but in 33 different colors on either a white or black background. (The classic canvas features gold monograms on a brown background.) Murakami also created the Cherry Blossom pattern, in which smiling cartoon faces in the middle of pink and yellow flowers were sporadically placed atop the Monogram Canvas. This pattern appeared on a limited number of pieces. The production of this limited-edition run was discontinued in June 2003. Within 2003, the stores in Moscow, Russia and in New Delhi, India were opened, the Utah and Suhali leather lines were released, and the 20th anniversary of the LV Cup was held.
Louis Vuitton situated on the famous Champs-Elysées.

The store in Yekaterinburg (Russia)

Louis Vuitton on Briggate, Leeds.
In 2004, Louis Vuitton celebrated its 150th anniversary. The brand also inaugurated stores in New York City (on Fifth Avenue), São Paulo, Mexico City, Cancun and Johannesburg. It also opened its first global store in Shanghai. By 2005, Louis Vuitton reopened its Champs-Élysées store in Paris designed by the American Architect Eric Carlson, and released the Speedy watch collection. In 2006, LV held the inauguration of the Espace Louis Vuitton on its 7th floor. In 2008, Louis Vuitton released the Damier Graphite canvas. The canvas features the classic Damier pattern but in black and grey, giving it a masculine look and urban feel. Also in 2008, Pharrell Williams co-designed a series of jewelry (“Blason”) and glasses for Louis Vuitton.

In 2010, Louis Vuitton opened what it described as their most luxurious store in London.

In early 2011, Louis Vuitton hired Kim Jones as its “Men Ready-to-Wear Studio and Style Director”. He became the lead designer of menswear while working under the company-wide artistic directorship of Marc Jacobs.

On 17 September 2011, Louis Vuitton opened its first Island Maison (island mansion) in Singapore, the first ‘maison’ to be opened in South-east Asia.

2012 to present
As of September 2013, the company hired Darren Spaziani to lead its accessory collection.

On 4 November 2013, the company confirmed that Nicolas Ghesquière had been hired to replace Marc Jacobs as artistic director of women’s collections. Ghesquière’s first line for the company was shown in Paris in March 2014.

On 7 April 2014, Edouard Schneider became the head of press and public relations at Louis Vuitton under Frédéric Winckler, who is Vuitton’s communications and events director.

Brand
The Louis Vuitton brand and the LV monogram are among the world’s most valuable brands. According to a Millward Brown 2010 study, Louis Vuitton is the world’s 29th most valuable brand, right after Gillette and before Wells Fargo. The brand itself is estimated to be worth over US$19 billion. For six consecutive years, Louis Vuitton was number one of the ten most powerful brands list published by the Millward Brown Optimor’s 2011 BrandZ study with value of $24.3 billion. It was more than double the value of the second ranking brand.
A Louis Vuitton “Sarah Wallet”
Louis Vuitton is one of the most counterfeited brands in the fashion world due to its image as a status symbol. Ironically, the signature Monogram Canvas was created to prevent counterfeiting.[23] In 2004, Louis Vuitton fakes accounted for 18% of counterfeit accessories seized in the European Union.

The company actively seeks to tackle counterfeiting, and employs a team of lawyers and special investigation agencies to pursue offenders through the courts worldwide. The company allocates approximately half of its communications budget to counteract counterfeiting of its goods. LVMH (Vuitton’s parent company) further confirmed this by stating: “Some 60 people at various levels of responsibility working full-time on anti-counterfeiting in collaboration with a wide network of outside investigators and a team of lawyers.” The company closely controls the distribution of its products. Until the 1980s, Vuitton products were widely sold in department stores (e.g., Neiman Marcus and Saks Fifth Avenue). Today, Vuitton products are primarily available at authentic Louis Vuitton boutiques, with a small number of exceptions. These boutiques are commonly found in upscale shopping districts or inside luxury department stores. The boutiques within department stores operate independently from the department and have their own LV managers and employees. LV has an online store, through its main website, as an authorized channel to market its products.

In 2006, the company attempted to have the LV.com domain name compulsorily transferred to it from its American proprietor; the action failed and the domain was subsequently acquired by LV=, an English friendly society/insurance company.

Louis Vuitton products
Since the 19th century, Louis Vuitton trunks have been made by hand. Contemporary Fashion gives a preview of the creation of the LV trunks: “The craftsmen line up the leather and canvas, tapping in the tiny nails one by one and securing the five-letter solid pick-proof brass locks with an individual handmade key, designed to allow the traveler to have only one key for all of his or her luggage. The wooden frames of each trunk are made of 30-year-old poplar that has been allowed to dry for at least four years. Each trunk has a serial number and can take up to 60 hours to make, and a suitcase as many as 15 hours.”

Iconic bags of Louis Vuitton include the Speedy bag and Neverfull bags. Each season Louis Vuitton produces rare, limited edition bags that are generally only available by reservation through larger Louis Vuitton stores.

Many of the company’s products utilize the brown Damier and Monogram Canvas materials, both of which were first used in the late 19th century. All of the company’s products exhibit the eponymous LV initials. The company markets its product through its own stores located throughout the world, which allows it to control product quality and pricing. It also allows LV to prevent counterfeit products entering its distribution channels. In addition, the company distributes its products through the company’s own website, LouisVuitton.com.

Advertising campaigns
The Louis Vuitton company seeks to cultivate a celebrity following and has used famous models, musicians, and actors such as Keith Richards, Madonna, Sean Connery, Hayden Christensen, Angelina Jolie, Gisele Bündchen and most recently David Bowie in its marketing campaigns. On 2 August 2007, the company announced that the former USSR leader Mikhail Gorbachev[28] would appear in an ad campaign along with Steffi Graf and Catherine Deneuve. Many rappers, most notably Kanye West, Juicy J and Wiz Khalifa have mentioned the company in certain songs.

The company commonly uses print ads in magazines and billboards in cosmopolitan cities. Louis Vuitton Posters by Razzia were popular in the 1980s. It previously relied on selected press for its advertising campaigns (frequently involving prestigious stars like Steffi Graf, Andre Agassi and Catherine Deneuve) shot by Annie Leibovitz. However, Antoine Arnault, director of the communication department, has recently decided to enter the world of television and cinema: The commercial (90 seconds) is exploring the theme “Where will life take you?” and is translated into 13 different languages. This is the first Vuitton commercial ad ever and was directed by renowned French ad director Bruno Aveillan.

Special collaborations
Louis Vuitton has had many collaborations with prominent artists and designers. Takashi Murakami created special edition collections, such as the Monogramouflage Collection, which debuted in 2008, and a previous collection, released in 2002, which featured some of his artwork. The creations were “painted” over the traditional monogram canvas, which brought a radical new twist to the timeless design. Marc Jacobs also commemorated a previous collaboration, designed by Stephen Sprouse. This collection, originally released in 2001, featured bold print that looked like graffiti, over the traditional canvas. The recreation of the collab used the same idea, but gave it a new twist using bold colors, like hot pink, neon green, and orange, that also glow in the dark. This recreated version of the graffiti collection was finally released in 2009 to much fanfare. Louis Vuitton also collaborated with Kanye West in 2009, designing his own limited run of shoes. Most recently, Jacobs teamed up with Yayoi Kusama to create the “Infitinetly Kusama” Collection, which features bold colors of dots over the vernis leather or the monogram canvas. These pieces come in black with white dots, red with white dots, and yellow with black dots. It was released in July 2012.

Controversy and disputes
Britney Spears video
On 19 November 2007 Louis Vuitton, in further efforts to prevent counterfeiting, successfully sued Britney Spears for violating counterfeiting laws. A part of the music video for the song “Do Somethin'” shows fingers tapping on the dashboard of a hot pink Hummer with what looks like Louis Vuitton’s “Cherry Blossom” design bearing the LV logo. Britney Spears herself was not found liable, but a civil court in Paris ordered Sony BMG and MTV Online to stop showing the video. They were also fined €80,000 to each group. An anonymous spokesperson for LVMH stated that the video constituted an “attack” on Louis Vuitton’s brands and its luxury image.

Simple Living

“Simple Living” image (left) and Vuitton’s Audra bag, created by Takashi Murakami (right)
On 13 February 2007, Louis Vuitton sent a Cease and desist order to Danish art student Nadia Plesner for using an image of a bag that allegedly infringed Louis Vuitton’s intellectual property rights. Plesner had created a satirical illustration, “Simple Living”, depicting a malnourished child holding a designer dog and a designer bag, and used it on T-shirts and posters to raise funds for the charity “Divest for Darfur”.[31] On 25 March, the court ruled in favour of LV that the image was a clear infringement of copyright. Despite the ruling, Plesner continued to use the image, arguing artistic freedom, and posted copies of the Cease and desist order on her website. On 15 April 2008, Louis Vuitton notified Plesner of the lawsuit being brought against her. Louis Vuitton demanded $7,500 (5,000 Euro) for each day Plesner continues to sell the “Simple Living” products, $7,500 for each day the original Cease and desist letter is published on her website and $7,500 a day for using the name “Louis Vuitton” on her website, plus legal and enforcement costs.

An LVMH spokeswoman interviewed by New York Magazine said that Louis Vuitton were forced to take legal action when Plesner did not respond to their original request to remove the contested image, nor to the subsequent Cease and desist order. In October 2008, Louis Vuitton declared that the company had dropped its lawsuit but have since reopened it along with a new €205,000 claim due to a painting by the same artist. In May 2011, the court in The Hague found in favour of Plesner’s right to freedom of expression.

Craftsmen advertisements
In May 2010, the British Advertising Standards Authority banned two of the company’s advertising spots, depicting craftsmen at work on its products, for being in breach of its ‘Truthfulness clause’. The ASA said that the evidence supplied by Louis Vuitton fell short of what was needed to prove the products were made by hand. The ASA said that the two adverts would lead consumers to interpret that Louis Vuitton bags and wallets were almost entirely hand-crafted, when they were predominantly created by machine.

The ASA stated: ‘We noted that we had not seen documentation that detailed the entire production process for Louis Vuitton products or that showed the proportion of their manufacture that was carried out by hand or by machine. Vuitton denied that their production was automated, arguing that over 100 stages were involved in the making of each bag; they however admitted that sewing machines had been used in production process.’

Checker pattern chair in Hong Kong Barber shop
In February 2013, Louis Vuitton issued a complaint against the owner of a barber shop in Hong Kong for allegedly violating its intellectual property rights in relation to a stool using fabric coating that is similar to the checker pattern in Louis Vuitton’s handbags. According to the Hong Kong-based Apple Daily newspaper, the company was seeking a compensation of HK$25,000 (around US$3,200) and the publication of an apology in the form of newspaper advertisement. The owner had sourced basic furniture and equipment from the PRC for starting his shop. Facing this accusation, the barber shop owner said he had no means to tackle Louis Vuitton and may have to close down his shop which has been operating for 1 year in a remote local district on Hong Kong Island. The controversy had caused tremendous concern on Hong Kong news forums and viral protest on Facebook pages.

S-Lock copyright in Hong Kong
In another legal warning dated back to Sep 2012, Louis Vuitton had filed complaints against two small retail shops in Hong Kong for allegedly violating its intellectual property rights in relation to the “S-Lock” design for Louis Vuitton’s handbags. According to the Hong Kong-based Apple Daily newspaper, the company was seeking a compensation of HK$40,000 (around $US 5,000) and a public apology in the newspaper. The shopkeeper refused to pay, and Louis Vuitton demanded further damages up to HK$150,000 in February 2013. The shop claimed to have sourced 2 such handbags from Japan at around HK$120, which it retailed at HK$220. In the case of the other small-shop selling 2 handbags, they argued with Louis Vuitton that the designs were different, and got LV’s demand reduced to HK$5,000 (around US$640). The owner refused to pay and said they were ready to face LV in court.

Louis Vuitton News 2016

We exist on the digital frontier, at the dawn of a virtual age in which all experience will be filtered through screens. Nicolas Ghesquière, long one of fashion’s most intrepid designers, isn’t looking back. Since he arrived at Louis Vuitton in early 2016, the idea of travel has propelled him; Vuitton has been in the business of making luggage since 1854, after all. But this season he took a different kind of journey. “We are all living with this new dimension,” he said afterward. “We are all managing how to integrate these new notions of digital, virtual, and cyber with our real life.”

A conversation between technology and nature animated the new collection, his most audacious yet for the house, and one that had his fans chiming, “The old Nicolas is back.” The old Nicolas was a sci-fi obsessive and an experimentalist, qualities he subsumed early on during his tenure at LV that came rocketing to the fore here. His reference points were many: Wong Kar Wai’s 2046 and the anime series Evangelion came up backstage. The show itself started with an introduction to the video game Minecraft, which will be familiar to anyone with young children. Later, a sound clip from Tron: Legacy, the original of which was a favorite movie from Ghesquière’s own childhood, played. “I tried to picture clusters of information as they moved through the computer,” Jeff Bridges intoned. “What did they look like? Ships? Motorcycles? Were the circuits like freeways? I kept dreaming of a world I thought I’d never see, and then one day . . . I got in.”

Ghesquière’s cyberpunks wore moto jackets and metal-embroidered skirts, laser-cut leathers and beaded knits that coded like armor, and spaceship-print pants. Leather gauntlets keyed a tough, aggressive attitude, but the designer’s vision was not a dystopic one. On the contrary. He was quick to point out that his materials looked high-tech but were actually not synthetics at all. What with the nailhead-embroidered peasant dresses, the crafty sweaters, and the festival-girl crop tops and shorts, Vuitton Spring looked a lot like a digital bohemia.

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Check out Louis Vuitton’s new rolling trunks by Marc Newson

Louis Vuitton News

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The trunk is available in three sizes mini (50 x 35 x 20 cm), cabin (55 x 39 x 21 cm) and maxi (68x 46 x 26 cm) and you have a range of materials to choose from including classic Monogram canvas, Monogram Eclipse, Damier Graphite, Taiga leather and Epi leather in seven different colors.
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“I think it’s safe to say that we’re striving to break new ground in terms of developing a product which is one of the lightest in the market, and from a technical perspective is one of the most rigorously designed and engineered,” said Newson. “I’m obsessive about packing everything into a bag of a certain size, which is why it was so important for me to design a product that could tick all of those boxes and be the perfect piece of luggage for a person like me, [who] won’t travel with anything more than is absolutely necessary.”
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Louis Vuitton trunks are luggage classics, but they can be pretty cumbersome and ill-suited for air-travel. These new rolling trunks, make the much loved design more accessible and mobile giving you the best travel experience possible.

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LOUIS VUITTON IS GOING TO MAKE FRAGRANCES AGAIN AFTER 70 YEARS

Louis Vuitton News

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Louis Vuitton has owned the world with its well-loved leather goodies but after 70 long years, the French Fashion House is going to test the waters again when it comes to the fragrance sector.

The French brand shared that it will now take a different approach to fragrance as the same will take its inspiration from travels, journeys and adventures from far flung countries.

We are definitely over the moon as we love traveling and exploring so this fragrance sounds exciting. For others, traveling is the greatest love of their lives and having a go-to Louis Vuitton fragrance while you’re out there conquering the world is an added bonus.

The newest scent Les Parfums Louis Vuitton is expected to make its debut in September, after more than four years of in-depth research and analysis. The fragrance label will be a license of French conglomerate LVMH, of which Louis Vuitton is the front-running brand.

The master behind the scent is no other than expert perfumer Jacques Cavallier Belletrud. Over the long expanse of his career, Mr. Belletrud became a perfume asset to LVMH brand such as Fendi, Givenchy, Kenzo, Christian Dior and Bulgari among others.

In order to come up with the scent, Mr. Belletrud himself has travelled the world seeking his muse and in the end, he was able to create a scent that has notes of “exotic places and rare materials.”

More information will follow soon…

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For Spring 2017, Louis Vuitton Took Its Men’s Bags on a Fantastical Storybook Safari

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You Can Buy Some of the Bags From Louis Vuitton’s Cruise Brazil-Themed Cruise 2017 Collection Immediately

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Tag: Louis Vuitton Cruise

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Preview Of Louis Vuitton Cruise 2017 Collection

Louis Vuitton News

Louis Vuitton recently presented their Cruise 2017 Collection at the Niterói Museum of Contemporary Arts in Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. The sporty collection pays homage to the city’s culture which presents vibrant colors, football and Grand Prix prints with a touch of Parisian flair. The star of the show is the Boombox Bag which is made of the Petite Malle bags which can even play music through Bluetooth. The iconic Speedy Bag features racing prints with Vuitton logo emblazoned on it and comes with a combination of the House classic materials such as the Damier, Epi and Monogram Canvas. The City Steamer gets an edgy update with a variety of pockets and rivets. Louis Vuitton introduces the Football print seen on the Steamer and Twist bags.

Tag: Louis Vuitton Cruise 2017

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